Tobias Betz & Felix Fent | TU Munich

Presentation title: Indy Autonomous Challenge – A Different Approach for Autonomous Driving

Tobias Betz joined the Institute of Automotive Technology in January 2021 as a Research Associate and Ph.D. student under the supervision of Prof. Dr.-Ing. Markus Lienkamp. He graduated with a Master of Science in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the Technical University of Munich. His research focuses on reducing the computing time in the perception of an autonomous vehicle by applying in-memory computing devices. Another research interest is applying event-based sensors to achieve the lowest possible latency in the overall software.
At the TUM Autonomous Motorsport Team, he is responsible for the overall race strategy and testing the software’s performance at the Hardware-in-the-Loop simulator.

Felix Fent studied mechanical engineering at the Technical University of Munich and graduated as Master of Science in Automotive Engineering. He joined the Institute of Automotive Technology in 2021 as a Research Associate and Ph.D. student under the supervision of Prof. Dr.-Ing. Markus Lienkamp. Felix Fent dedicates his work to the development of perception algorithms for autonomous vehicles, where he focusses on object detection based on automotive radar data as well as data fusion of multiple sensor modalities. Within the TUM Autonomous Motorsport Team, he is responsible for the commissioning of the sensor setup and the radar-based object detection pipeline.

19.30 - 20.00

Pre-evening networking dinner Wednesday, November 10, 2021

Indy Autonomous Challenge – A different approach for Autonomous Driving

Details

The Indy Autonomous Challenge is a $1.5 million prize competition between universities in which modified race cars are programmed by competing teams. The world's first autonomous head-to-head race at speeds of up to 300 kilometers per hour takes place at the famous Indianapolis Motor Speedway. The TUM Autonomous Motorsport Team presents their development workflow for the fully autonomous software stack. The real-world application is tested using Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulation as well as cloud computing. This ensures that the software is challenged and optimized using complex situations from the very beginning of the development cycle.